Applying decals on the car windows or even the windows in your house may be a great way to express your personality or promote your business.

The relatively new decals that have been applied on glass surfaces are easier to remove.

However, the more time a decal remains on the surface, the harder it becomes for it to come off. As time goes by, the decals are baked by heat from the sun, making them harder to remove. This is the main reason why some of the most recommended decals removal methods, such as finger nails and heat guns, will not work on the old decals.

Over the years, I have received hundreds of calls and emails, regarding the best way to get rid of the baked vinyl decals from glass surfaces.

Although you may want to get rid of that annoying decal on the window of your house or house, you still do not want to waste an entire Saturday doing this.

Some people spend more than two hours trying to remove the baked vinyl decals from the standard family home glass window.

However, you do not have to waste your Saturday doing this; so long as you have the right tools and removal method, you should be able to remove the decal from the glass surface in no time.

Having been in the decals and sticker removal business for a couple of years, I have expansive experience in removing stickers and decals from various surfaces, including glass surfaces. I have also used different decals removal methods; so have a really good understanding of the best removal method for the baked decals on glass surfaces.

As such, I have been offering various tutorials and videos on how to remove decals and stickers on my website.

The main concern when removing older decals is damaging or scratching the glass surface, on which the decals are attached.

In hot environments, the adhesive used on decals tend to fuse with the glass surface as time goes by.

This makes a heat gun inappropriate as a removal tool for such decals.  Additionally, using chemical decals removers may end up staining the glass surface. The best tool for such a task is the whizzy wheel.

Why the Whizzy Wheel?

The answer here is pretty simple; as opposed to other decals removal methods, such as using fingernails or chemical removers, the Whizzy wheel will definitely remove the old decals that have been baked by the sun.  So, how do you use the whizzy wheel in this regard?

  • Having acquired the whizzy wheel, you will need to unpack it from its package.
  • If you do not have a drill, you will need to get one before proceeding with this procedure.
  • With the drill at hand, you should connect the whizzy wheel to the drill, a task that should be pretty easy to accomplish.
  • Now adjust the speed of the drill to about 3500 revolutions per minute before starting it.
  • Start the drill and apply the whizzy wheel on the surface of the vinyl decal you are trying to remove.
  • Move the drill in a forward-to-back motion while pressing it against the glass surface.

Note: IF YOUR WINDOW IS VERY OLD, THIN OR BRITTLE, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND THE WHIZZY WHEEL AS THE PRESSURE MAY CRACK OR BREAK THE GLASS.

IN THIS CASE, USE A Whizzy Plastic BLADE

Rather than wasting your entire Saturday trying to remove baked decals from a glass surface using orthodox methods, you should make use of the methods and tools that have been tested and proven to work, such as the whizzy wheel. This way, you will get your Saturdays back and still get rid of that ugly vinyl decal without causing any damage to the glass surface it is attached to.

The Dos and Don’ts

  • Ensure that you clean the vinyl surface of any dirt and debris prior to applying the whizzy wheel to avoid scratching the glass surface.
  • If any adhesive remains after you have removed the decal, you may use a citrus degrease to wipe it off.
  • Consider wearing safety gear, such as goggles, while using this method to avoid injuries.

For a video demonstration on how to use a whizzy wheel, you can take a look at this video.

<iframe width=”420″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/kzTz-YVcR_A” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>